The Editor

Welcome to Issue 66, June 2021.

The front cover shows Steve Poteet’s recently finished 1946 TC restoration. Steve owns M.H. Frank Ltd., a small men’s clothing store in Clemson, South Carolina. In 2014, a customer, knowing of Steve’s love of MGs, offered to sell him his father’s TC.  Thinking this would be a great addition to his collection – a 1962 MGA and a 1953 MGTD – Steve headed to Atlanta with a trailer.

The late Hank Rippert, President of the New England ‘T’ Register recommended Paul Johnson of Pinehurst, North Carolina for the restoration. Of course, there were issues. A new old stock tub was found in Lexington, Kentucky. Barry Walker in England helped with the lamps and horn. Craig Seabrook in Ohio recalibrated the instruments and the burled walnut dashboard. Sammy Jordan worked his magic on all the metalwork, including the paint job. Steve even contacted the first owner of the car in Scotland to determine the original colour scheme.

Six years later, the 1946 MGTC came home to Clemson. Steve’s only complaint is there is not enough time to drive it!

The age profile of T-Series owners means that there will be an increasing number of us who pass away as the years go by. Gerry Brown, a leading figure in UK M.G. circles for more than 40 years died on 10th March. Ian Linton, who contributed a number of articles to this magazine, died at the beginning of April.  In Australia, Vale Ken Stewart-Richardson died on 9th February. Ken, who was in constant pain for months said to Michael Sherrell with a smile on his face from his hospital bed, a week before his death, that he wanted his last ride to be in a TC. Taken aback, Mike had no idea as to how this could be done, but he assured Ken and his wife, Mary Ann that he would somehow find a way to fulfil his request. Turning to ‘wizard engineer’ John Bowles for help, JB did a few measurements and calculations, consulted with the funeral bods, and came up with a light, simple, three-piece frame to go into Mike’s TC and to be screwed to the wooden floor. It had to work first time and it did, as the pictures show.

Derry Dickson’s TC ‘Matilda’ is currently up for sale and has attracted a lot of interest. It was featured in Issue 63. Another TC (TC3335) is for sale, located in the SF Bay Area of California. Both cars are on the ttypes.org website.

Later in this issue you will find a period advert for ‘The MG Super Sports Morris’ dated November 1923. This has been provided, courtesy of Brian Rainbow of the MG Octagon Car Club, who received it from one of his members. The first recorded sale of this model was in August 1923 and this advert from The Isis (a student publication at the University of Oxford, where the magazine was established in 1892) is further confirmation (if further confirmation was needed) that the centenary of M.G. should be celebrated in 2023 and not 2024. Despite this, I’ve seen what is probably the latest strapline from MG, which reads ‘FINDING SOLUTIONS SINCE 1924’. Where do they get their information from?

Peter Hehir, Public Officer of the M.G. T Type Owners & Restorers Club, based in Australia, has been in touch to say that since the Club’s formation (which was reported in Issue 60 of TTT 2, June 2020) membership, which spans five countries, has grown to 175. It has been decided to cap the membership at 200 and applications received above this ceiling would go on a waiting list. An outline of the Club’s aims, activities and objectives was given in Issue 60 of TTT 2. For further information, please contact Peter at peter.m.hehir(at)gmail.com [please substitute @ for (at)]. Since joining the TTORC I have to say that I am hugely impressed with the Club’s bimonthly magazine.


This issue contains an article by Eric Worpe on TC stub axle spindle replacement. Eric has recently obtained a small stock of spindles and is prepared to fit them for owners. Eric’s contact details are at the end of the article.

How quickly the year has gone by! Those of you who receive a printed copy of the magazine will find a subscription renewal note with this issue. Despite increases in postal charges, subs remain the same.


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